Connected & Supported

We feel connected when we feel close to others; we feel supported when we feel like others care about us and are available to help. When students feel connected to their teachers and peers, they feel more positive about school. The more social support students report having, the more they report feeling physically healthy and having high self-esteem.

Activities

Resources
“I Wonder” Ball
This activity, written by North Haven High School Students, is designed to get a class feeling connected and supported.
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Life Just Got Real
Students identify potential challenging scenarios that students their age encounter. In small groups, they work together to identify the fears, opportunities, possible actions, and possible consequences related to that situation. As a class, they review and discuss each group's ideas.
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What is Support?
Students reflect silently on their personal definitions of the word “support.” In small groups, they discuss their personal definitions and work together in small groups to create a “support vision” that establishes what being supported and supportive mean to them. Students work together as a class to combine small-group visions into a larger vision of support for the class.
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“Intentional” Family Tree
Students are introduced to the concept of “intentional family” to describe the people with whom we choose to surround ourselves, whether they are biologically or technically family or not. Then, they identify members of their “intentional family” and create an “intentional family” tree to be displayed in the classroom. Students reflect on how it felt to complete this activity and how they can best let their intentional family members know how important they are to them.
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Positive Word Cloud
Students generate two positive words or phrases to describe each person in their class. Students each receive a list of the words/phrases other students generated and reflect on how accurate they believe the descriptions are. A collective, visual display of all students’ descriptions is created and posted in the classroom. Students reflect on the diversity of positive traits in the classroom and the feelings associated with giving and receiving compliments.
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Lollipop Moments
Students watch and reflect on a video about “everyday leadership” and “lollipop moments” that describes the small positive impacts we make in the lives of those around us. Then, students write a letter to thank someone in their lives who has helped shape who they are in a positive way. Students share in groups how the activity made them feel and discuss how they can create and identify lollipop moments in their own lives.
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